Customer Stories
Survey ideas for startups: a few examples
Survey ideas for startups: a few examples

Businesses have lots of questions. Startups have even more. How do we price our service? Do customers like our new logo? Are we doing a good job in customer support? And, of course, where should we hold the company picnic?

We recently partnered with startup fund Y Combinator to help start ups get the feedback they need. From core business and customer questions to internal planning and fun questions, getting feedback is critical for startups and new business efforts.

We’ve always been big fans of Y Combinator. This summer, we actually took things to a new level by acquiring a Y Combinator company, Wufoo. The entire Wufoo team has been a welcome addition to our headquarters in Palo Alto. We wanted to continue to support startups, and recently set up a discount arrangement for Y Combinator companies on our pro accounts and Audience product.

How have startups been using SurveyMonkey? Here are some recent examples:

  • Pricing tests
  • Finding early customers testimonials
  • Gathering customer demographics
  • Testing images for new logos or concepts
  • Planning company meetings or events
  • Early product feedback
  • SurveyMonkey or Wufoo webforms for new hire applicants

And, here are two examples from ReadyForZero, a Y Combinator startup that has generously agreed to share their surveys below.  ReadyForZero is an online program that helps people manage and reduce debt on their own.  The company hopes to build a product that gives people insight into their fiscal situation and help them get to where they want to be financially.

They see surveys as a great way to understand and engage their users, in addition to traditional engagement channels such as social media, content and email.  They sent out their first survey a month after launch to understand what users thought of the product and what they could do to improve moving forward.

Recently, the ReadyForZero team sent out a survey to understand user demographics and to see if they could draw any connections between demographics, frequency of product use and user sentiment in hopes to refine their marketing efforts. (A few of the questions came from our new Question Bank!) They got some pretty interesting results and are excited to start using the insights.